Tag Archives: microRNA

Genomic and Epigenetic Alterations Deregulate microRNA Expression in Human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

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ovarian

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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ,105(19) ,7004-9.

Abstract
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of small noncoding RNAs that function as negative gene regulators. miRNA deregulation is involved in the initiation and progression of human cancer; however, the underlying mechanism and its contributions to genome-wide transcriptional changes in cancer are still largely unknown. We studied miRNA deregulation in human epithelial ovarian cancer by integrative genomic approach, including miRNA microarray (n = 106), array-based comparative genomic hybridization (n = 109), cDNA microarray (n = 76), and tissue array (n = 504). miRNA expression is markedly down-regulated in malignant transformation and tumor progression. Genomic copy number loss and epigenetic silencing, respectively, may account for the down-regulation of ≈15% and at least ≈36% of miRNAs in advanced ovarian tumors and miRNA down-regulation contributes to a genome-wide transcriptional deregulation. Last, eight miRNAs located in the chromosome 14 miRNA cluster (Dlk1-Gtl2 domain) were identified as potential tumor suppressor genes. Therefore, our results suggest that miRNAs may offer new biomarkers and therapeutic targets in epithelial ovarian cancer.

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DIANA-microT web server: elucidating microRNA functions through target prediction.

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microtwebserver

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Nucleic Acids Res. ,37(Web Server issue):W273-6.

Abstract
Computational microRNA (miRNA) target prediction is one of the key means for deciphering the role of miRNAs in development and disease. Here, we present the DIANA-microT web server as the user interface to the DIANA-microT 3.0 miRNA target prediction algorithm. The web server provides extensive information for predicted miRNA:target gene interactions with a user-friendly interface, providing extensive connectivity to online biological resources. Target gene and miRNA functions may be elucidated through automated bibliographic searches and functional information is accessible through Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. The web server offers links to nomenclature, sequence and protein databases, and users are facilitated by being able to search for targeted genes using different nomenclatures or functional features, such as the genes possible involvement in biological pathways. The target prediction algorithm supports parameters calculated individually for each miRNA:target gene interaction and provides a signal-to-noise ratio and a precision score that helps in the evaluation of the significance of the predicted results. Using a set of miRNA targets recently identified through the pSILAC method, the performance of several computational target prediction programs was assessed. DIANA-microT 3.0 achieved there with 66% the highest ratio of correctly predicted targets over all predicted targets. The DIANA-microT web server is freely available at www.microrna.gr/microT.

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DIANA-mirPath: Integrating human and mouse microRNAs in pathways.

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mirpath

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Bioinformatics. ,2009 Aug 1;25(15):1991-3.

Abstract
DIANA-mirPath is a web-based computational tool developed to identify molecular pathways potentially altered by the expression of single or multiple microRNAs. The software performs an enrichment analysis of multiple microRNA target genes comparing each set of microRNA targets to all known KEGG pathways. The combinatorial effect of co-expressed microRNAs in the modulation of a given pathway is taken into account by the simultaneous analysis of multiple microRNAs. The graphical output of the program provides an overview of the parts of the pathway modulated by microRNAs, facilitating the interpretation and presentation of the analysis results.

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Accurate microRNA target prediction correlates with protein repression levels.

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accurateBMC

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BMC Bioinformatics ,2009 Sep 18;10:295.

Abstract

DIANA-microT 3.0 is an algorithm for microRNA target prediction which is based on several parameters calculated individually for each microRNA and combines conserved and non-conserved microRNA recognition elements into a final prediction score, which correlates with protein production fold change. Specifically, for each predicted interaction the program reports a signal to noise ratio and a precision score which can be used as an indication of the false positive rate of the prediction. Recently, several computational target prediction programs were benchmarked based on a set of microRNA target genes identified by the pSILAC method. In this assessment DIANA-microT 3.0 was found to achieve the highest precision among the most widely used microRNA target prediction programs reaching approximately 66%. The DIANA-microT 3.0 prediction results are available online in a user friendly web server at http://www.microrna.gr/microT

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Review: Lost in translation: an assessment and perspective for computational microRNA target identification.

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lost_in_translation

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Bioinformatics , 25(23):3049-55

Review
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short endogenously expressed RNA molecules that regulate gene expression by binding directly to the messenger RNA of protein coding genes. They have been found to confer a novel layer of genetic regulation in a wide range of biological processes. Computational miRNA target prediction remains one of the key means used to decipher the role of miRNAs in development and disease. Here we introduce the basic idea behind the experimental identification of miRNA targets and present some of the most widely used computational miRNA target identification programs. The review includes an assessment of the prediction quality of these programs and their combinations.

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miRGen 2.0: a database of microRNA genomic information and regulation

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mirgen2

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Nucleic Acids Research , 38(Database issue): D137–D141.

Abstract

MicroRNAs are small, non-protein coding RNA molecules known to regulate the expression of genes by binding to the 3’UTR region of mRNAs. MicroRNAs are produced from longer transcripts which can code for more than one mature miRNAs. miRGen 2.0 is a database that aims to provide comprehensive information about the position of human and mouse microRNA coding transcripts and their regulation by transcription factors, including a unique compilation of both predicted and experimentally supported data. Expression profiles of microRNAs in several tissues and cell lines, single nucleotide polymorphism locations, microRNA targetprediction on protein coding genes and mapping of miRNA targets of co-regulated miRNAs on biological pathways are also integrated into the database and user interface. The miRGen database will be continuously maintained and freely available at http://www.microrna.gr/mirgen/.

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The DIANA-mirExTra web server: from gene expression data to microRNA function.

Publication

mirextra

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PLoS ONE ,5(2):e9171

Abstract
High-throughput gene expression experiments are widely used to identify the role of genes involved in biological conditions of interest. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are regulatory molecules that have been functionally associated with several developmental programs and their deregulation with diverse diseases including cancer. Although miRNA expression levels may not be routinely measured in high-throughput experiments, a possible involvement of miRNAs in the deregulation of gene expression can be computationally predicted and quantified through analysis of overrepresented motifs in the deregulated genes 3′ untranslated region (3’UTR) sequences. Here, we introduce a user-friendly web-server, DIANA-mirExTra (www.microrna.gr/mirextra) that allows the comparison of frequencies of miRNA associated motifs between sets of genes that can lead to the identification of miRNAs responsible for the deregulation of large numbers of genes. To this end, we have investigated different approaches and measures, and have practically implemented them on experimental data. On several datasets of miRNA overexpression and repression experiments, our proposed approaches have successfully identified the deregulated miRNA. Beyond the prediction of miRNAs responsible for the deregulation of transcripts, the web-server provides extensive links to DIANA-mirPath, a functional analysis tool incorporating miRNA targets in biological pathways. Additionally, in case information about miRNA expression changes is provided, the results can be filtered to display the analysis for miRNAs of interest only.

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Review: Online resources for microRNA analysis.

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review_jnai

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Journal of Nucleic Acid Investigation, 2(1)

Abstract

The use of online tools for bioinformatics analyses is becoming increasingly widespread. Resources specific to the field of microRNAs are available, varying in scope and usability. Online tools are the most useful for casual as well as power users since they need no installation, are hardware independent and are used mostly through graphic user interfaces and links to external sources. Here, we present an overview of useful online resources that have to do with microRNA genomics, gene finding, target prediction and functional analysis.

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DIANA-microT Web server upgrade supports Fly and Worm miRNA target prediction and bibliographic miRNA to disease association.

Publication

web_server_microT

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Nucleic Acids Res. 39(Web Server issue):W145-8

Abstract

microRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous RNA molecules that are implicated in many biological processes through post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. The DIANA-microT Web server provides a user-friendly interface for comprehensive computational analysis of miRNA targets in human and mouse. The server has now been extended to support predictions for two widely studied species: Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. In the updated version, the Web server enables the association of miRNAs to diseases through bibliographic analysis and provides insights for the potential involvement of miRNAs in biological processes. The nomenclature used to describe mature miRNAs along different miRBase versions has been extensively analyzed, and the naming history of each miRNA has been extracted. This enables the identification of miRNA publications regardless of possible nomenclature changes. User interaction has been further refined allowing users to save results that they wish to analyze further. A connection to the UCSC genome browser is now provided, enabling users to easily preview predicted binding sites in comparison to a wide array of genomic tracks, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms. The Web server is publicly accessible in www.microrna.gr/microT-v4.

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TarBase 6.0: capturing the exponential growth of miRNA targets with experimental support.

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tarbase6

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Nucleic Acids Res. 40(Database issue):D222-9

Abstract
As the relevant literature and the number of experiments increase at a super linear rate, databases that curate and collect experimentally verified microRNA (miRNA) targets have gradually emerged. These databases attempt to provide efficient access to this wealth of experimental data, which is scattered in thousands of manuscripts. Aim of TarBase 6.0 (http://www.microrna.gr/tarbase) is to face this challenge by providing a significant increase of available miRNA targets derived from all contemporary experimental techniques (gene specific and high-throughput), while incorporating a powerful set of tools in a user-friendly interface. TarBase 6.0 hosts detailed information for each miRNA–gene interaction, ranging from miRNA- and gene-related facts to information specific to their interaction, the experimental validation methodologies and their outcomes. All database entries are enriched with function-related data, as well as general information derived from external databases such as UniProt, Ensembl and RefSeq. DIANA microT miRNA target prediction scores and the relevant prediction details are available for each interaction. TarBase 6.0 hosts the largest collection of manually curated experimentally validated miRNA–gene interactions (more than 65 000 targets), presenting a 16.5–175-fold increase over other available manually curated databases.

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